Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Canola Oil is actually Rapeseed Oil – The name says it all!



According to Natural News, the real problem with the name "rapeseed oil" was that the oil was so toxic that the FDA banned it for human consumption in 1956. So when Canadian growers bred a new variety of rapeseed in the 1970s with a lower content of the toxic erucic acid, they decided that they needed a new name for it.

The term canola was coined from "Canadian oil, low acid" to convince consumers that this oil was safe to eat. And while "canola" was originally a registered trademark, the term became so widely known that the trademark was eventually abandoned, and canola became the default term in many countries for any low-erucic rapeseed oil.

Canola oil is a very effective insecticide, and it is the primary ingredient in many "organic" (non-chemical) pesticide control products sprayed on vegetables to kill bugs.
 
What happens to YOUR organs and your blood when you consume insecticide regularly?

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Canola oil can have detrimental effects on your health, especially the genetically modified (GM) canola that Monsanto so conveniently manufacturers for the masses to consume. It's all mixed into those fancy, condiment-loaded, creamy salads at the friendly grocer, and it's FRESH! Step right up to the fresh bar! Add in some tasty conventional spices and keep it hot or cold in those little bins for those "whole" food enthusiasts. Lots of people pack a few of the canola "mixtures" into plastic (BPA) containers and take them home.

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As much as 50 percent of the olive oil sold in the U.S. is not actually pure olive oil, as some brands claiming to be "extra-virgin" or "100 percent Italian," for instance, have actually been adulterated with toxic rapeseed oil, more popularly known as canola oil, along with soybean oil and other low-grade oils. In his new book, Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil, olive oil expert Tom Mueller explains that not all olive oil is the same and offers advice on how to spot authentic olive oil amidst all the imposters.

During a recent interview with Terry Gross from National Public Radio's Fresh Air, Mueller explains how olive oil adulteration is much more widespread than people think, if they are even aware of it at all. For olive oil to truly be considered "extra-virgin," it has to come from fresh, crushed olives and not be refined in any way or contain any chemical solvents. It also has to pass certain tests of integrity in order to be considered legitimate. Many of the brands popularly sold today would fail.

"The legal definition simply says it has to pass certain chemical tests, and in a sensory way it has to taste and smell vaguely of fresh olives, because it's a fruit, and have no faults," said Mueller. "But many of the extra-virgin olive oils on our shelves today in America don't clear [the legal definition]."

To see some fascinating and interesting clips regarding the horrifying truth about the rapeseed oil issue and more, one can easily log onto:


 

 

 

 

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